Free E–pub [Arrow to the Sun A Pueblo Indian Tale] ✓ Gerald McDermott

  • Library Binding
  • 40
  • Arrow to the Sun A Pueblo Indian Tale
  • Gerald McDermott
  • English
  • 17 March 2018
  • 9780140502114

Gerald McDermott ↠ 2 Characters

Arrow to the Sun A Pueblo Indian Tale Read & download º 2 F bees and the kiva of lightning Striking in its simplicity and grace Arrow to the Sun vividly evokes the Native American reverence for the source of all life the Solar FireWinner of the Caldeco. The subtitle is A Pueblo Indian Tale and the Caldecott winning artwork is reminiscent of Native art I ve seen with a color palette rich with oranges reds yellows and browns The book relates how the Lord of the Sun sent his spirit to the people of earth I cannot help but compare this Pueblo Indian tale with the story of ChristThe Lord of the Sun sends a spark of life to earth where it enters the house of a maiden who then has a baby The boy is persecuted by others and then travels to his Father After enduring several trials the father tells the son you must return to earth and bring my spirit to the world of men So he returns to earth and the people celebrate with the dance of life

Summary Arrow to the Sun A Pueblo Indian TaleArrow to the Sun A Pueblo Indian Tale

Arrow to the Sun A Pueblo Indian Tale Read & download º 2 Oy searches for his father but before he can claim his heritage he must first prove his worthiness by passing through the four ceremonial chambers the kiva of lions the kiva of snakes the kiva o. I had a difficult time deciding how I felt about this story On the one hand the illustrations are certainly striking And I really enjoy spiritual myths such as this Yet I also found myself wondering at the authenticity and had a hard time reconciling the imagery with my own albeit limited knowledge of the Pueblo peopleI decided to do a bit of research and discovered this excellent article from The Horn Book s actually This is the fifth of a continuing series of articles celebrating the history of the Caldecott Medal which marks its seventy fifth anniversary this year Librarian and children s literature historian Kathleen T Horning looks at one seminal but unheralded Caldecott book of each decade identifying trends noting the changing nature of the picture book wrestling with issues and definitions Here she examines the 1975 winner Arrow to the Sun Viking adapted and illustrated by Gerald McDermott through the lens of cultural authenticityIt s well worth a read and I am going to try and get to the other articles in the series as well It really shines a light on the decision making process of the Caldecott committee not just looking at the books as art but also as a means of showcasing and promoting cultural awareness euality etc I had been thinking of this for example with the back to back wins for the Dillons in this line upIn terms of Arrow to the Sun the article made me realize at once why I had felt slightly troubled by the illustrations it was not only the rather garish color choices but the use of the Kachina figure Picture Books Art and Illustration published in Lee Kingman s Newbery and Caldecott Medal Books 1966 1975 Horn Book Barbara Bader was also highly critical of the committee s choice calling it the most problematic of the lot in actuality kachina dolls represent supernatural beings rain spirits and the like not human figures To blur the distinction is to rob the kachina image of its point and to suggest wrongly that geometric dolls represent the Pueblo image of people From early times the Pueblos have drawn human beings realistically As for the story itself Debbie Reese and Naomi Caldwell Wood reviewed the book for their chapter in Violet J Harris s Using Multiethnic Literature in the K 8 Classroom in which they examined the depiction of Native Americans in children s literature In a section called Controversial and Problematic Books they acknowledge that the story is captivating but critiue it on two major points the fact that McDermott sets the boy s trials inside kivas places of ceremony and instruction not places of trials and the idea that the fatherless boy was ostracized by his people a concept foreign to the PuebloOf course one wonders what the Pueblos themselves feel about the book and their response was actually mixed and I think this reminds us of the importance of not grouping all those in a particular culture together For example those from traditional groups were troubled by the already mentioned issues in the book did not feel the book was appropriate to share with their children Whereas a teacher from a less conservative group had no issue with the bookI m glad I read the book but I think I would look for authentic tales to share with young readers

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Arrow to the Sun A Pueblo Indian Tale Read & download º 2 With vibrant colors and bold geometric forms Gerald McDermott brilliantly captures the stylized look of Pueblo Indian art in this Caldecott Award winning retelling of an ancient legend A young b. I actually did end up liking Gerald McDermott s Caldecott Medal winning Arrow to the Sun uite a bit than I had originally expected to as it is indeed an evocative tale and the illustrations although not really all that much to my aesthetic tastes in and of themselves are really and truly visually stunning and spectacular working exceedingly well with the author s narrative with McDermott s text And even though these same illustrations are actually and supposedly considered controversial and inappropriate by some I personally really had and have no issues whatsoever with the fact that Kachina figures are used by Gerald Mcdermott since Arrow to the Sun is basically about a supernatural being who becomes a boy and is sent to earth definitely shadows of Jesus Christ here it therefore and in my opinion kind of does make a bit of common sense to use supernaturally representative Kachina figures as the accompanying pictorial images However as much as I have indeed enjoyed both story and illustrations in a general and uncritical sense Arrow to the Sun still leaves me with a rather and majorly problematic and bitter taste in my mouth as while the author s presented narrative is definitely captivating and much engaging one cannot deny that the entire concept of the young boy being ostracised due to his having no father due to being illegitimate is actually and in reality totally foreign to Pueblo culture and that kivas are never and were never used as places of trial of testing but as places of community ceremony healingNative American Pueblo activist and university professor Debbie Reese actually goes so far as to claim that she believes Arrow to the Sun to be a gross misinterpretation of Pueblo of her and those of her tribe s way of approaching and caring for children and Pueblo ways of spirituality and worship and after having done a bit of supplemental online research and now having read Arrow to the Sun myself I would tend to agree with her assessment one hundred percent it does not make me unappreciative of the book it does not make me absolutely despise Arrow to the Sun but it does seem to take much of the bloom off of my potential and actual reading enjoyment Now if Gerald McDermott had included a detailed note stating that he had changed certain tenets of Pueblo culture and lore to suit his story while I would probably still not have found this entirely acceptable I would definitely now have less issues with Arrow to the Sun but no author s note no acknowledging of sources and information on what has been altered are in any manner included and that fact is rather problematic even on its own and while I do realise that supplemental authors notes are generally a relatively recent phenomenon with this book with Arrow to the Sun an author s note really should be an absolute and reuired must Still somewhat recommended is Arrow to the Sun but with the necessary caveat that if reading this book with and to children the authenticity issues the fact that for many and especially for many Native Americans this book is controversial and even considered inappropriate and potentially disrespectful of Native American culture and tradition should be discussed and actually absolutely must be discussed Crome Yellow end up liking Gerald McDermott s Caldecott Medal winning Arrow to the Sun uite a bit than I had originally Animorphia An Extreme Colouring and Search Challenge evocative tale and the illustrations although not really all that much to my aesthetic tastes in and of themselves are really and truly visually stunning and spectacular working Borka The Adventures of a Goose with no Feathers exceedingly well with the author s narrative with McDermott s text And Chinese Cinderella III even though these same illustrations are actually and supposedly considered controversial and inappropriate by some I personally really had and have no issues whatsoever with the fact that Kachina figures are used by Gerald Mcdermott since Arrow to the Sun is basically about a supernatural being who becomes a boy and is sent to Shadowed Stranger earth definitely shadows of Jesus Christ here it therefore and in my opinion kind of does make a bit of common sense to use supernaturally representative Kachina figures as the accompanying pictorial images However as much as I have indeed From Sinner to Saint enjoyed both story and illustrations in a general and uncritical sense Arrow to the Sun still leaves me with a rather and majorly problematic and bitter taste in my mouth as while the author s presented narrative is definitely captivating and much The Murders in the Rue Morgue engaging one cannot deny that the His Mistletoe Bride entire concept of the young boy being ostracised due to his having no father due to being illegitimate is actually and in reality totally foreign to Pueblo culture and that kivas are never and were never used as places of trial of testing but as places of community ceremony healingNative American Pueblo activist and university professor Debbie Reese actually goes so far as to claim that she believes Arrow to the Sun to be a gross misinterpretation of Pueblo of her and those of her tribe s way of approaching and caring for children and Pueblo ways of spirituality and worship and after having done a bit of supplemental online research and now having read Arrow to the Sun myself I would tend to agree with her assessment one hundred percent it does not make me unappreciative of the book it does not make me absolutely despise Arrow to the Sun but it does seem to take much of the bloom off of my potential and actual reading Octopussy and The Living Daylights enjoyment Now if Gerald McDermott had included a detailed note stating that he had changed certain tenets of Pueblo culture and lore to suit his story while I would probably still not have found this Octopussy and The Living Daylights entirely acceptable I would definitely now have less issues with Arrow to the Sun but no author s note no acknowledging of sources and information on what has been altered are in any manner included and that fact is rather problematic Octopussy even on its own and while I do realise that supplemental authors notes are generally a relatively recent phenomenon with this book with Arrow to the Sun an author s note really should be an absolute and reuired must Still somewhat recommended is Arrow to the Sun but with the necessary caveat that if reading this book with and to children the authenticity issues the fact that for many and Fifth Avenue Uptown Tale Blazers especially for many Native Americans this book is controversial and Power Engineering even considered inappropriate and potentially disrespectful of Native American culture and tradition should be discussed and actually absolutely must be discussed